Summer Concert Series Begins + New Parkside Picnic Tables

 

Flash back to summer of 2015, when we were just getting started building the brewpub…

The days were hot.

Like ridiculously hot.

Like this week kind of hot.

The building had no insulation or A/C.

And, sadly, there was no beer on tap yet.

But every week we looked forward to the concerts in the park across the street. We’d open the garage doors, continue working awhile longer, then sit back with a bottle of something good and listen to live music while imagining what it would finally be like one day when our restaurant was open in the summer.

 

Now the Medford Parks and Rec Summer Concert Series is finally here in Pear Blossom Park! Starting this Thursday, August 4th, you can come enjoy live music from the amphitheater across the street the way it was meant to be enjoyed (at least, according to us beer lovers). Come grab your favorite brew and sit back on the patio every Thursday at 7pm for fresh air, live shows and good grub at the Medford Commons, August through September.

 

Medford Parks & Rec Summer Music Concert Series: Pear Blossom Park

 

The Deadlies, 8/3

Sonido Alegre, 8/10

Fogline, 8/17

Bishop Mayfield, 8/24

Matt Brown, 8/31

Blue Lightning, 9/7

Salsa Brava, 9/14

The Evening Shades, 9/21

 

If you haven’t seen them yet, we also invite you to come sit at our next sidewalk picnic tables on the park side of the building. Perfect for four, it’s as up-close-and-personal as you can get to the live music while still having a beer in hand. And just in case the sun hasn’t quite gone down yet when the music starts, each table also has an umbrella for shade. Kids, families and dogs all welcome.

We’re excited to applaud a new concert downtown every week, and hope you’ll join us in supporting some awesome musical performances and the efforts of Medford Parks and Rec. If you decide to grab a front row seat on the lawn, bring along your lawn chairs and blankets and make yourself comfortable for the two-hour concerts. And if you get hungry, come on over for a bite, or grab yourself a pizza to-go to enjoy back on your blanket across the street. Concerts play until 9pm, and we’re here serving a full menu and full bar until 11pm, every night.

Stockholm Syndrome & The Wild Rogue Relay

With the Wild Rogue Relay just around the corner, we asked Common Blocker Nick Blakeslee to write a little something about the race and about running.  Take it away, Nick!

People do silly things.  Certainly looking at politics or my dating history, one can see that to be self-evident.  I’ve done a lot of silly things in my life, and one of them is picking up running.  I picked it up because of the Wild Rogue Relay, a 212-mile relay event that goes from the Applegate, Oregon to Brookings, Oregon.  All on foot, those miles are shared between twelve teammates over the course of 36-ish hours.  That was my first ever running event; the equivalent of entering your child in the Tour de France moments after removing their training-wheels.

Me, pictured lower right. Friends, pictured everywhere else, enjoying post-race relaxation. Yes, that’s a mimosa in front of me. Yes, my coffee has Baileys in it. Yes, that’s pain behind my smile.

Let me be honest with you all for a moment: I really like relaxing.  Like, really like it.  If I were to make a list of the top 10 things I enjoy in life, nine of those things would be centered around relaxing.  Like eating, or sleeping, or eating then sleeping, or reading a book, or watching a good movie, or sitting by the river drinking my favorite trashy—err, economic beer.  Relaxation is the ultimate first world pastime, and if half the world can’t enjoy it, I mean to enjoy it for them, dangit.  I live in a day in age when I can spend more than half of my week not hording food for winter, or dying of dysentery, or stockpiling guns to deal with bandits.  If there ever was a time to be alive, and live in America, it would be now.  I just ordered 20 pounds of cat litter, from the comfort of my home, and it arrived two days later.  I didn’t even have to get up.  If that’s not the future, I don’t know what is.

So picking up something like long distance running has perplexed some people.  Certainly myself.  It’s one thing to pick up a sport, or a workout paired with fun.  It’s a whole different story running forward at an even pace for 45 minutes.  I’ve always said I detested things like long distance running and working out – if I get in shape, I have to be tricking myself.  I have to be chasing a Frisbee or racing a friend or leaping for some flags in football.

Let me be clear: I’m not a true distance runner.  I’m a fake, in that I don’t really work hard.  In a way, I won the genetic lottery when it comes to long distance running and it allows me to get away with a lot.  I don’t know of many people who can train for a 21-mile event only four weeks prior.

I’ve alienated a few of you with that last comment.  I understand.  I hate those types of people, too.  The kind that can just pick something up and fly with little or no repercussions.  I have a friend who does that with anything art-related, and a little piece of me hates him for it.  He’s the guy that sees you trying to learn something and says, “Let me try” and proceeds to demonstrate your inadequacy without the need for words.

Running long distances, in my mind, is the ultimate display of masochism.  It’s quintessential flagellation, self-abuse, or self-hate.  Only humans existing in a first world, modern society would long distance run during their free time.  Only someone like us would deal with boredom by putting on a pair of shoes and running for 35 miles, just because.  I smile at a thought; wondering what our ancestors would think if we told them that we spent our weekends, our early pre-sunrise mornings, our post-work evenings, and overall free-time, running.  Choosing running.  Actively chasing it, spending hundreds of dollars on expensive shoes and sportswear.  Worst of all, we pay money to enter races.  No one owns the globe, or even the property on which we run a lot of times, and yet we give them cold hard cash to be able to sweat and hurt and run.   We give them money to run on the same streets we walk to work on everyday.

You can tell this is a candid photo because no one looks like they know what they’re doing.

And yet it’s the perfect representation of humanity’s desire to move.  It demonstrates that we weren’t meant to sit in cubicles or melt into couches five hours a day or commute to work for twenty years.  It’s a part of me I’ve actively tried to smother, to say, “Listen here, pre-industrial-revolution-evolutionary-biology, you don’t need to move.  You don’t have to get up.  Just sit down and let Netflix take dictate the next three hours.  Also, pass the popcorn.”

But even I, a man who carefully partitions out his schedule with items titled “Relax,” was coaxed into exercising.  A few years back, there was an opening on a team for the Wild Rogue Relay.  I felt reluctantly obligated because everyone kept telling me how good I was going to be at it.   And being a true, selfish millennial I thought, “Well, gee, I wouldn’t mind spending a weekend receiving compliments on my natural athleticism.”

So I opened my closet, quite literally dusted off my $20 New Balance tennis shoes I bought on sale at Costco three years prior, and went on a run.  We ran three miles that first time.  And I did pretty good.  I rewarded myself with a Blue Cheese and Bacon Burger with a side of fries and three fingers of Whiskey. I know, I’m channeling that insufferable friend of mine.  There’s a special place in hell for people like me.

This is the part of running stories where it usually diverges.  In one camp, there are those who instantly fall in love with it.  They love the pain, they love the suffering, they love pushing themselves and seeing how far they can go.  And they don’t stop.  They keep going and going, increasing their mileage and their speed until they’ve gone too far.  We call them Ultra runners, but really they should be named Stop-you’re-making-me-look-bad runners.  They enter into crazy things, like 50 milers and 100 milers – spans of distance most people wouldn’t want to hop in a car and drive, because it takes too long.  This is where my theory of masochism enters.

We’re smiling because this is after we’ve had (several) beers.

And then there are those who never really fall in love with it.  These are my people.  We look at running like the DMV or foot-corn pumice stones: disgusting, but a necessity in modern day society.

I’ve never felt what’s called the “Runner’s High.”  I don’t know if my tolerance is too high, or if it’s things like joint pain, exhaustion, and side aches getting in the way.  People like me can’t enjoy the run because according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, we’re stuck at the bottom of the pyramid: we’re in pain.

So it’s weird that I’d not only run in something like the Wild Rogue Relay, but I’d do it without a threat to my being or a family member held hostage.  Even more odd, The Wild Rogue Relay is something I look forward to every year.

Don’t tell my friends, and certainly don’t tell my teammates (I have a reputation to uphold), but there’s something to be said about willing yourself to do something difficult.  Running 21 miles over the course of a weekend is no easy feat, especially when one only spends four weeks preparing for that run.  At some point during my legs, usually between the first and last mile, I hate everything.  I hate the music I’m listening to.    I hate the heat.  I hate my life and I hate my legs. I hate running.  And I hate myself for signing off a weekend away—one that could be spent drinking beer and relaxing—so I could run 21 miles.

But when I see the finish line, a part of me stirs to life.  It’s that piece of my humanity that knows I have to stop being sedentary.  It’s that portion that hates cubicles, that despises commuting every day, detests the social media lifestyle our world has become.  I come to life, a smile on my face, in part because I’m almost done, but also because it feels good to accomplish something.

Best of all it’s the faces that greet me that fill me with joy.  My friends and teammates cheer me in; they lie to me and say, “You look great” and “Wow, a 12 minute mile? That was quick,” and “You look so relaxed.”  They hand me my things: my coconut water, my banana, and my chocolate bar.  Small bits of pleasure that keep me running.

I sit in the back of the truck or van with the window down, usually my legs are shaking and I’m still out of breath.  But I feel good, certainly not high, but good.  Even if only for that moment—that infinitesimal amount of time where I rehydrate and catch my breath—I feel more alive, and I don’t really mind that my weekend isn’t filled with relaxation practices and the whole thing doesn’t seem as silly to me anymore.

And, really, that’s what it’s all about.  It’s about saying, “No thank you” to the smothering language of our society that says, “Sit down.  Stop moving.  Relax.  You’ve earned it.”

Because moving is in our biology.  It’s in our DNA.  Moving is what makes us what we are, and if deny it, we deny our humanity.  And that would just be silly.

Our Top Picks for Medford Beer Week 2017

It’s like Christmas, but with beer and in June, and only in the Rogue Valley! Medford Beer Week is an annual Southern Oregon-wide celebration of our awesome region’s contributions to the craft beer world. Not only do we have world-class beers being brewed locally and regionally, we’re also home to top-notch establishments – both restaurants and bars – that understand the importance of quality beer and the food served alongside it.

For the celebration, June 1st-10th, we’ve teamed up with Climate City Brewing Co. in Grants Pass for a collaboration beer – Slow Row Single Hop Amber. This brew is made with smooth and floral Azacca hops and Mecca Grade malts, and you can come get a taste starting this Thursday, June 1st to kick off the celebration week!

 

Here are our top 5 picks for things to do during Medford Beer Week 2017:

 

Brews, Burgers & Bluegrass | Saturday, June 3rd | RoxyAnn Winery

This family-friendly, fundraising event includes more than a dozen breweries, five foot-tapping bluegrass bands, delicious BBQ, home brew classes, and kid’s activities all at RoxyAnn Winery. Ticket outlet and online sales at roguebbb.org

6th Annual Kickball Tournament | Saturday, June 3rd | The Schoolhaus Brewhaus, Jacksonville

Teams compete in a double elimination bracket for the coveted Deschutes Kickball Trophy (and of course bragging rights!). $50 per team, minimum 8 players fielded (teams are co-ed, 21+ only on the field – minors welcome in the audience). Sign up at info@theschoolhaus.com

Cornhole Tournament | Thursday, June 8th | Middleford Alley, Medford

Get your team together, and come downtown on Thursday night to try your hand at the Ninkasi and Summit Cornhole Tournament. Sign-ups and beer garden open at 5pm, and live music with Beth Henderson & Blowin Smoke starts at 6pm. Cornhole until 9pm, with prizes for the top three teams.

2nd Annual Hearts and Hops Food Truck and Brewery Competition | Friday, June 9th | The Medford Commons

Join your favorite food trucks as they compete for the “Best Pairing” with local craft beer offerings. Enjoy music by The Rogue Suspects and sample tons of specialty brews all evening long. 100% of the proceeds go toward community-based organizations dedicated to the elimination of domestic violence. For more information and tickets visit www.heartsandhops.com

9th Annual Southern Oregon Craft Brew Festival | Saturday, June 10th | The Medford Commons

This is the mac-daddy finale of Medford Beer Week! With over 60 beers to sample, the Southern Oregon Craft Brew Festival is a “must attend” for Beer Week lovers. $20 gets you a commemorative pint glass and eight tasting tickets, with additional tasting tickets available for 5 for $5, or 12 for $10. Finish your week at Southern Oregon’s only beer-centric beer festival. Pre-sale tickets available at Beerworks Medford and Beerworks Jacksonville for $16.

 

Don’t forget to come by for the newest Common Block/Climate City beer on tap, Slow Row Single Hop Amber. It’s got a medium body, malty mouthfeel and light hoppy finish – we’re thrilled with how this beer came out! We feel ridiculously lucky to live, work and brew in this awesome place, and can’t wait to celebrate with everyone during Medford Beer Week 2017,

 

 

 

 

 

May is the Month to Hop On Your Bike!

 

May is National Bike Month, making it the ideal time to pedal, walk, bus or carpool around town from Point A to Point B. It’s also the month for joining two statewide and local challenges: The Street Trust’s Bike More Challenge encourages individuals and workplaces throughout Oregon to compete for most miles and trips biked during the month of May. The Rogue Commute Challenge by the Rogue Valley Transportation District (RVTD) pits local workplaces on a leaderboard to see which organization can log the most collective alternative transportation trips. Both are awesome reasons to try new ways to get where you need to be!

 

About the Bike More Challenge

 

The Challenge is a state-wide, month-long friendly competition between workplaces to see who can get the greatest percentage of employees to log the most trips on their bike. Ride your bike to work, the grocery store, or for fun and log all of your trips at bikemorechallenge.com! At the end they tally the results, give out awards in different categories of company size and sector, and celebrate everyone’s hard work and commitment for the month.

 

About the Rogue Commute Challenge

 

The Rogue Commute Challenge allows workplaces to team together and compete against other local workplace teams to see who can log more walking, biking, carpooling, transit, or telecommute trips and earn glory by being named King of the Rogue Commuters! This fun competition is a great way to learn more about commuting options, earn prizes, get healthy, reduce our carbon footprint and build camaraderie while competing to have your workplace win the Challenge! It’s all about fun, building teamwork, and learning about the commute options available in the Rogue Valley.

 

If you haven’t already, you can still sign up for the Bike More Challenge, as well as enjoy all the local events associated with RVTD’s Go By Bike Week, May 15-19. Register for the bike skills class, join group rides with free snacks and schwag, visit a breakfast station, and sign up for the Grow a Pear Run, Walk, or Bike 5K.

 

And if you find yourself biking in downtown Medford, feel free to use our community bike racks! We’ve got plenty of room for all, and then come inside and grab a beer because, dangit, you deserve it! Our team of Common Blockers will be cruising on bikes and busses logging points, too (we have coworkers biking from Ashland, Talent, Phoenix and Eagle Point!), so please cheer them on if you see their blue shirts commuting around the valley.

 

 

Racing Toward the Siskiyou Challenge, 4/29

What has five legs, gives free beer, is seven years old and runs all over?

No, it’s not a rocket-fueled elderly starfish with a keg of beer on its back. It’s the 7th Annual Siskiyou Challenge Relay in Ashland, Oregon! We love this yearly race, so much so that we sponsor the event with free beer and food for racers at the finish line. The five relay legs weave all around Ashland on April 29th, from Emigrant Lake to the hills north of town, and then end at a big finale party at ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum.

The Siskiyou Challenge Relay benefits one of our favorite local organizations: Rogue Valley Farm to School. RVF2S educates children about our food system through hands-on farm and garden programs, and by increasing local foods in school meals. We love their mission, their programs and this race!

 

Here are the Siskiyou Challenge race legs:

 

  1. 3K kayak at Emigrant Lake
  2. 30K road bike around Ashland, over to Valley View Road, and back to Lithia Park
  3. 6K trail run above Lithia Park
  4. 13K mountain bike in the hills above Ashland
  5. 6K run to the finish at ScienceWorks!

 

Speaking of racers, watch out for our team on the course: the Common Block Fantastic Five. And when we say “Fantastic Five,” we really mean a group of moderately active people that hope to survive until the free beer at the end (less fantastic, more thirsty).

Looking for something for the whole family? There’s also a 1-mile fun run that begins and ends at ScienceWorks. Sign ups start at 9am on Saturday and the run begins at 10am. Everyone can enjoy finish line activities, including live music on the outdoor stage, vendors, exhibits and more.

Register now for the Siskiyou Challenge!

You can still register online through 4/27 at 11:59pm (late fee of $20 after 4/25)! Grab your best athletic pals, come up with an awesome team name, and join us for the fun this Saturday. We’re serving up enchiladas, beer, cider and root beer at the finish line (if you need a little more incentive), and the weather is supposed to make for a beautiful race day. We hope to see you there!

 

The Zombies are Coming! Register NOW for the Running Dead 5K

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Ahhhhhhhh!!!!

That’s the sound you’ll hear all over downtown Medford on October 22nd for Goodwill’s Running Dead 5K. Zombies and humans are taking over the Medford Commons in a race to benefit Southern Oregon Goodwill and all the awesome things they do in our community. Sign up as an alive or undead runner, and then join us afterward for the Apocalypse Party in the Common Block parking lot.

Here’s how it works: Racers take off from the Medford Commons and run out-and-back along the Bear Creek Bike Path for 3.1 miles. Humans will take off with three flags around their waists at 4:30, and zombies will take off at 4:32. Zombies do their best to catch flags from humans, and humans have to dodge the zombies and get back to the finish line with as many flags as possible. Awards will be given to King of the Zombies and Ultimate Survivor.

And don’t forget about all the perks! Ro Sham Bo will be on-hand providing free makeup for all zombies – come as you are and start the race looking zombie-tastic. We’re giving $5 gift certificates to all the racers, and serving beer at the finish line alongside Ooblies Waffle Truck and Curbside King. Lastly, you can enter to win at the Drop Dead Beauty Contest – show off your fantastic zombie makeup as you strut across the stage! Kids ages 4-8 can join the fun, too, with the Survivor Sprint around the Commons park blocks.

If you’ve always wanted to practice for the impending zombie apocalypse and haven’t known where to start, this is it! Get real-life experience running from zombies or being a zombie – really, its just being well-prepared. You can double up on your costume, too, for Halloween (we won’t tell anyone).

Register online soon to chase or be chased, and be sure to come see us for a beverage from 2pm-10pm on race day. We’ll be here with open doors, corn hole, food trucks, beer and root beer on tap, and a whole lot of zombie-themed excitement. Don’t get caught dead missing out on the fun!

 

 

 

 

Hop on the Oregon Drive Less Challenge, October 1-15

PrintTune up your bike, lace your walking shoes, and grab your bus pass for RVTD’s annual Drive Less Challenge, October 1-15th! If you’re looking for a little extra motivation to try alternative transportation options around town, this week is full of prizes, events and contests to make the jump a little sweeter.

Participating is easy: register at drivelessconnect.com and start logging your trips every day. You’ll see your travel totals, arrange carpooling, and enter to win prizes. Trying to think of fun ways you can cruise around town? Hop on Medford’s Pint Rider and pedal around to breweries and bottle shops with 14 of your best friends. Just think, you can log miles and grab brews along the way!

Find new fresh-air travel routes for work and around town, and get your coworkers to log on, too, and earn your workplace status as a Regional Leader. Save yourself money and time while adding some fun and exercise to your routine, or hop on one of the fantastic RVTD busses and let someone else do the driving. Any which way you do it, have fun joining the masses of alternative transportation commuters in October, and logging all your efforts to see just how much you can save in money and CO2 emissions over two great weeks. Go forth, and ride!

Pints at the Peak: Pouring Beer at the SOB

This Saturday is the race day we’ve all been waiting for! Well, only if you’re a runner training for the Siskiyou Out Back. And if you are, we applaud you! Racers will line up this weekend to compete in the 15K, 50K or 50-mile annual SOB run beginning and ending at the Mt. Ashland lodge. This race fills up every year (that’s right, there are 175 people out there willing to run 50 miles!), and for a good reason. The views are stunning, the volunteers are wonderful, and the swag at the end is pretty great, too.

About the Race

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(photo: runoregonblog.com)

Starting at a cozy 6,500 feet altitude, this course meanders along the Pacific Crest Trail with views of Mt. Shasta and Mt. McLaughlin. Runners traverse single-track trails through wildflower meadows and mountain-top terrain, as well as unpaved roads with plenty of sunshine. It’s one of those races where you think to yourself “If I’m running today, this is where I want to be.”

About the Finish

2015 15K finishers

Our Common Block Team of finishers in 2015 (the baby didn’t actually run).

This is the good part! Because, let’s face it, we all love the races we’ve done after we finish them. After charging across the finish line, every racer gets their finisher’s medal, and the 50-mile racers grab their commemorative S.O.B. ceramic mug. Our Common Block comrades are pouring free beer outside the lodge for all the runners, alongside meals for purchase from the race organizers. If anyone deserves a cold beer in the sunshine this Saturday, it’s these racers.

So if you’re racing or supporting, we’ll see you there! If not, we recommend heading up the hill (that is, Mt. Ashland) to cheer on these awesome athletes as they cross the finish line. Runners will be coming in 11:00am (for the 15K) to 7:00pm, so there’s plenty of time to drive to the lodge and make the racers feel great with claps, cheers, and high fives all around. We’ll high five you, too.

Photo Recap: The Wild Rogue Relay

What do we do when we want a quick break from building Common Block day in and day out? Get a group of friends together and run 218 miles to the coast, duh. We survived/ran/loved/endured/pick-your-own-verb-ed the Wild Rogue Relay last weekend with our 12-person team touring lakes, vineyards, rivers, mountain passes, beaches and trails along the way. We even brought free beer and pint glasses along to pour for all the weary and awesome racers at the end, because no one earns their beer like Wild Rogue Relay racers!

So what does 33+ hours of running, sleep deprivation, and the intimate quarters of a shared van look like? Since we knew there’d be points of delirium and chaos along the way, we took a bunch of photos to remember the weekend. And what an awesome weekend it was! We witnessed lots of amazing team support (that’s you, Clown Punchers), great attitudes (you rocked, Suck It Up Princess), and some killer dance moves by a whole lot of racers.

Here’s our photo recap of the weekend, and a quick note from Team Runners’ Block to the amazing organizers, volunteers, and support staff of the Wild Rogue Relay: We can’t wait to race again next year!

 

Fill Your Calendar to the Brim at Medford Beer Week

Get ready for Medford’s big, annual craft beer showcase! Medford Beer Week, June 2-11, is a citywide celebration of the craft beer industry. Breweries, restaurants and bars all show their love and commitment to local beer, and the food and entertainment they serve alongside it. You’ll find tastings, tappings, tours and more all around town every day of Medford Beer Week. So much to do, and so little time to do it (dreamy sigh).

Medford Beer WeekWe’re celebrating with our own Meet-the-Brewer event on Friday, June 10th from 5-8pm. Our brewer, John, will be on hand to talk his favorite topic: beer. We’ll also show you around the building so you can get a sneak peek of Common Block before we open later this year. We’ll pull out some chairs, open the big garage doors, and hang out for a few hours of craft beer appreciation and conversation.

Visit the Medford Beer Week events page for over 100 happenings all throughout the week. Seriously, there are a handful of events every day, all day long. Brunch, happy hour, dinner and late night…establishments all around town have you covered with great craft brews, special deals, games and entertainment. Here are our top picks for the week:

  • Kegs and Eggs with Buttercloud Bakery and Oakshire Brewing @ Beerworks Medford | June 4th | 10am – 1pm

This 4th annual event features a special “Kegs and Eggs” sandwich along with tastings of the Oakshire Brewing Overcast Espresso Stout. It’s not too early for beer. It’s 10am somewhere…

  • Brews, Bluegrass, and BBQ | June 4th | 12pm – 8pm

Tap into the best of the Rogue Valley’s food, drink, and music at the 4th annual Brew, Bluegrass, and BBQ presented by THRIVE. Eight hours, five bands, and 26 Rogue Valley microbrews on tap! Admission includes commemorative pint glass and tasting tickets. Buy tickets online at www.roguebbb.org

  • Hops Painting Class @ BricktownE Brewing | June 7th | 6pm – 8pm

Spend a couple of hours creating a beautiful HOP painting. Sign-ups are at BricktownE, or Tia Mckenzie’s facebook page: tiamckenzieart. $30 includes supplies and instruction.

  • Movies in the Biergarden with Worthy Brewing | June 9th | 8pm

What’s better than watching The Goonies? Watching The Goonies under the stars with a delicious stein of Worthy beer in your hand! Kicking off a full summer of Thursday night movies at Schoolhaus Brewhaus with an all-time favorite. Get there early to get a seat.

  • Southern Oregon Craft Brew Festival | June 11th | 12pm – 8pm

With over 25 breweries showing off their best offerings (over 50 beers to sample), this event is a must-attend for Medford Beer Week. $16 gets you a commemorative pint glass and 5 tasting tickets. Pre-sale tickets available at Beerworks Medford and Beerworks Jacksonville for $14. 21+ only.

Mark your favorite events for this awesome Southern Oregon celebration and show your love of the local craft beer community. We’re thrilled to add to the amazing local variety later this year, and in the meantime we’ll join in drinking up all that our valley has to offer. It’ll take some commitment to try all this beer, but we’re oh-so willing to do it.